Old Court House

Old Court HouseNeil McKnight
668 x 380 px. 61.4 Kb.

IIII
aA

Old Court House

The Albany Court House is a two-storey build­ing made from granite and red brick, with round­ed front corners and con­volut­ed granite archways.

As the grand­est and most ex­pens­ive country court house built during the gold boom, it featur­ed on post­cards and in pro­mot­ions of the town for dec­ades.

Design­ed by George Temp­le-Poole, the Albany Court was built by Charles Layton on the site of the old state school. The founda­tion stone was laid on 29th Dec­ember 1896 by F. H. Piesse MLA, with con­struc­tion est­im­at­ed to take nine months. However, due to a scarc­ity of bricks it was not com­plet­ed until 7th Febru­ary 1898 when it was open­ed the acting Pre­mier E.R. Wittenoom.

Origin­ally the build­ing con­tain­ed court rooms and the police stat­ion. Later, offices of the Public Works Depart­ment. In 1908, a lock up and gaol keepers resid­ence was built at the rear. In 1978, a redesign of the interior pro­vid­ed a second courtroom on the ground floor and im­pro­ve­ments to the office areas. In 1983, the ceil­ing of the main court up­stairs collaps­ed and need­ed replac­ing.

Today, the Albany Court House is one of sever­al herit­age build­ings that are part of the Albany Justice Com­plex

The build­ing features a Brit­ish coat of arms near the left arch­way, the arches themselves are con­volut­ed, arch­ing inwards as well as over each door­way. Inter­est­ingly, the front corners of the build­ing are rounded., while the roof is tiled in grey. The brick chimneys are topp­ed with terracotta.

Today, the Albany Court House is one of sever­al herit­age build­ings that are part of the Albany Justice Com­plex, com­plet­ed in Febru­ary 2006, locat­ed at the corner Stirl­ing Terrace and Collie Street.

Article updated 29/10/2016.